giant Cypress

A monk asked Joshu, “What is the meaning of
Bodhidharma's coming to China?”
Joshu said, “The oak tree in the garden.”

A monk asked Zhaozhou, “What is the living meaning of Zen?”
Zhaozhou said, “The cypress tree in the yard.”
giant Cypress
Wilbur Pan lives in New Jersey, and is responsible for what goes on here. This is mainly about Japanese woodworking tools and other wooddorking things. Plus stupid jokes.

You can ask a question using the “Ask” link above, or through the contact information at the bottom of the page.

I had the pleasure of meeting Elaine Stritch thanks to my wife many years ago. There won’t be another like her. Hope you enjoy yourself in Gay Paree, Elaine.

   Anonymous asked:

how can i got seed lac in pakistan

I got my seedlac from shellac.net. On their website, they say that they ship internationally.

This is clearly great value for your hand tool dollar. Used ryoba, found on eBay.
At least the original owner got his money’s worth out of this saw.

This is clearly great value for your hand tool dollar. Used ryoba, found on eBay.

At least the original owner got his money’s worth out of this saw.

Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info
Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.
In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.
Zoom Info

Christopher Schwarz, from the Lost Art Press blog:

The central idea in my next book, “The Furniture of Necessity,” is that there is a type of furniture that escaped the whims of fashion and has remained unchanged through the centuries because it is useful, simple, sturdy and (in a way) beautiful.

One of those types that Chris mentions is the Windsor-type stool. On my recent trip to Singapore, I kept seeing this type of stool. There is variation on how the stretchers are set up, but one thing all these stools have in common is that the legs are set into the top.

In addition, stools and benches with this sort of construction were ubiquitous when I went to China two years ago. It’s interesting how a furniture form can be truly global.

   Anonymous asked:

I've seen you mention your Rikon J/P combo in a couple of forum posts. Do you still have it, and use it? Do you find that you mostly use it as either a Jointer or Planer, or do you change back and forth regularly as needed? I'm an intermediate woodworker who is realizing that I don't love milling by hand and this machine looks like it (or the new spiral cutter model) would fit in my shed workshop nicely.

I initially looked into the Rikon 10” jointer/planer combo mainly because of a lack of space in my shop. I did not think that I would have the room for a separate jointer and planer. I have never regretted my decision.

I still have it and I still use it. I use it both in jointer and planer modes, and it’s easy to switch from one mode to the other. If I’m not using it for a project, the most common reason is that the board that I’m working with is too wide for my jointer/planer combo, in which case I’ll use hand tools.

The current Rikon 10” jointer/planer is a bit nicer than the model that I have. It has three cutters on the cutterhead, and mine has two. It’s also easier to adjust table alignment on the current model, and it looks like the dust collection is more robust. I see on the Rikon website that there is a helical head version of the 10” jointer/planer, which I am very jealous of.

There are a couple of things that I wish were better. The fence is a piece of crap for anything but 90° edge jointing. On the other hand, I hardly ever edge joint at anything besides 90°, and I can accomplish that task by hand. The mobile cart option is also a piece of crap. If you want a mobile cart, get a third party option instead.

Some people will point out that the tables are relatively short on a jointer/planer combo compared to a standard jointer, which is a “limitation”. I find that that issue to be overstated. You should be able to joint a board that is twice the length of the tables of a jointer, and for the 10” jointer/planer, that works out to a board that is 6’ 8” long. There aren’t that many projects that require a board that long, except maybe floor-to-ceiling bookcases, or really long dining room tables.

And if you really need to handle boards that long on a frequent basis, your shop is probably big enough to handle a 12” jointer/planer. You can easily rig up an outfeed stand to help with really long boards, or just get a friend to help. My 10” jointer/planer was able to do the initial milling of the 8’ long 4x4s that I used for my workbench top, and it was no problem feeding the boards with the help of a friend.

In the end, I have no regrets with my Rikon 10” jointer/planer, other than I should have gotten a third party mobile stand. The only thing I would consider replacing it with is a 12” or a 16” jointer/planer, if I had the room for it.

(For those who might be surprised that I’m writing about a woodworking machine on a Japanese hand tool blog, all I can say that if Shannon Rogers can do it, anyone can.)

Building a Roubo workbench rerun - 27

(Originally written Apr. 29, 2010)

My workbench is pretty much done. There are still a few things to do. I still need to make a sliding deadman, but I’ve found that I have other ways to deal with edge planing longer boards for now. I also need to tune up the handle for the vise, put some boards across the bottom stretchers for extra storage, and make a real pin for the leg vise instead of the 3/8” oak dowel that I’m using. I also want to hang an additional fluorescent light fixture above the bench.

But the bench is in position, and I’ve got the key parts of my wall tool storage up and running. As you can see, I decided to go with unfinished pine boards. I might decide to paint the pine boards later on, but that will be easy for me to do if I go that route, since all the tool storage is just screwed onto the pine boards.

So I’m finally declaring victory on this project. And it only took 18 months.

The exposed 2x4’s to the left of the bench is where my sharpening table is. It’s not there now so I can mount pine boards onto the 2x4’s like I did for my workbench. Then I’ll push it back in place.